Sieberg Quake

117 BCE

by Jefferson Williams


Introduction     Textual Evidence     Archeoseismic Evidence     Tsunamogenic Evidence     Paleoseismic Evidence     Notes     Paleoclimate - Droughts     Footnotes     References


Introduction

Sieberg (1932a, p.16), without citing a source, reports an earthquake in 117 BC, His entry reads as follows:
117 v. Chr. In Judaa groses Erdbeben mit zahlreichen Nachstosen nahrend mindestens eines Monats.

Translation - In Judea a big earthquake, followed aftershocks lasting at least a month.
There is no known paleoseismic or archeoseismic evidence to corroborate this earthquake report.

Textual Evidence

Archeoseismic Evidence

Tsunamogenic Evidence

Paleoseismic Evidence

Bet Zayda
Wechsler at al. (2014) records event CH4-E6 (modeled age 392 BCE – 91 CE) in paleoseismic trenches at Bet Zayda just north of the Sea of Galilee (aka Lake Kinneret).
Bet Zeyda Earthquakes
Figure 9. Probability density functions for all paleoseismic events, based on the OxCal modeling. Historically known earthquakes are marked by gray lines. The age extent of each channel is marked by rectangles. There is an age uncertainty as to the age of the oldest units in channel 4 (units 490-499) marked by a dashed rectangle. Channel 1 refers to the channel complex studied by Marco et al. (2005).
Dead Sea
No seismites were assigned to this alleged earthquake at the sites of En Feshka, En Gedi, or Nahal Ze 'elim.

Notes

Paleoclimate - Droughts

Footnotes

References